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Different Types of Water Heaters Available Today

As just about anyone who has ever been forced to shower in cold water on a winter day will appreciate and understand, the value of a device that can provide hot water instantaneously can never really be overstated. In fact, going without hot water, even for a day, can be a veritable nightmare in particularly cold climates.

While water heater repair or if required, the outright replacement of a water heater, is a task that is best left to highly professional plumbers, but nevertheless there is at least one particular job that you can do yourself. That is choosing the type of water heater so as to meet the needs of your home and your family members.

There are various different types of water heaters that are currently available in the market today. So, if you really dread that (almost) inevitable cold morning (and even colder water) shower then check out some of the options mentioned below:

When you are looking for a new water heater, try and make sure that it should not only be able to provide hot water but it should be energy efficient as well. Thereby, saving you a lot of money in the long run. There are three popular types of heaters that are currently popular in the USA:

Conventional Storage tank type of water heater

Conventional storage tanks are some of the most common type of water heaters found in homes all over the North American continent. Indeed, as the very name suggests, these water heaters consist of a water storage tank that has been suitably insulated. And in which water is both heated and stored until it is needed. These tanks are generally circular cylinders that are made to stand in a vertical position with the pressure valve and heating controls at the bottom and a venting chimney at the top.

In the case of a natural gas water heater, there is a stove located directly beneath the main water tank that can be easily controlled to determine optimal temperature. Most of them are also equipped with a ‘temperature and pressure safety relief valve’. This valve will automatically open to relieve excess pressure once the pressure increases to a certain level (typically 150 psi or in the case of heat if it reaches 210 °F in the main storage tank.

As a general rule, all natural gas water heaters usually use much less energy and cost less to operate than electric water heaters, but there is a downside to them as well. They are somewhat more expensive and considerably more difficult to install than their electric water heater counterparts.

In addition to that, a conventional storage tank water heater has to be thoroughly drained and then cleaned out (removal of sedimentary deposits) at least twice a year so as to increase their overall life expectancy. Statistically speaking, the average life expectancy of a typical storage tank water heater can be around a decade. If your hot water gas operated geyser can last beyond that, then it may well be considered simple good fortune, albeit it is very rare. Furthermore, these water heaters are essentially incapable of operating in regions where there is no availability of natural gas.

On demand water heaters

Rather than actually storing water, tank-less water heaters utilize intense flashes of extreme heat coursing through water-filled coils to heat the water as quickly as it is needed. Many, if not most tank-less water heaters, are far more energy-efficient than their conventional storage tank counterparts.

However, their initial costs tend to be a lot higher. Such water heating units can also be re-sized so that they are easily able to provide a continuous stream of hot water. This makes them ideal for all individuals who have to serve the heated water requirements of large families and their consequently larger hot water demand.

By and large, a tank-less model is considered ideal for those homes that are supplied abundantly with natural gas so as to heat the water. However, due to their high gas consumption, not only do they cost more in terms of gas bills, but they might also require larger diameter pipes than may be already installed at the house, thereby leading to a costly retrofit.

The same applies to many electric tank-less water heating models as well. This is because the wattage required to run them may be so high that it might blow the fuses in the electrical system. And as a result, a highly expensive upgrade may be required of the home's electrical capacity. Apart from that, the average tank-less water heater generally needs to be descaled of all minerals, at least once per annum to ensure that one is able to keep them operating them quite reliably.

The heat pump or hybrid water heating system

The Heat pump water heater is a unique design that essentially captures the heat from the air or the ground and transfers it into the water. Such water heaters are very energy efficient and they typically use up approximately less than 60 percent energy when compared to the standard electric water heater.

However, their initial costs are pretty high, even though the same may be recovered in the long run. And while they tend to cost a whole lot more than a standard electric water heating model, the lower energy bill more than make up for it in the long run. And as a bonus, the ecological foot print of such a heater is considerably less than their electrical counterparts.

However, acquiring a water heater is a big investment and the product has to last you for a very long time indeed. This is why it is imperative that you take the advice of the true blue professionals in this line of work. That is, Mesa Plumbing in Arizona. Just get in touch with mesaplumbingcompany.com to find solutions and answers to all your water heating needs and requirements.

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